Understanding and Developing Resilience To Information Warfare | Episode 75

Dr. Clint Arizmendi, an Adjunct Senior Research Fellow for the Australian Graduate School of Policing & Security’s Terrorism Studies program at Charles Sturt University, joins me to discuss information warfare in episode 75.

Of course, we look at the subject primarily through the lens of current events. Russia is covered, as is the Trump administration, social media, and the role technology companies and their platforms play in facilitating propaganda networks and distribution.

This is an issue that, primarily thanks to technology, can feel a bit overwhelming at times. The volume of propaganda that can be directed at an adversary is unprecedented. The ways in which it can be finely tuned and targeted are new developments as well. But all is not lost and we offer reasons for hope. We also argue for slight changes in perspective that will help mitigate the impact of messaging that seeks only to create chaos and divide its targets.

Deep State Conspiracies | Episode 74


Alex Finley
, a former officer of the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, joined me to discuss the rise of deep state conspiracies that often feature a monolithic, highly partisan, intelligence community at their center.

Much of Alex’s work (see the hilarious Victor in the Rubble and The Intelligence Community: Smart People Looking at Computers) demystifies the work of the intelligence community by exposing the tedious realities of government work. It is a perfect contrast to conspiracy theorist fantasies.

We also take on the current administration’s view of the IC, Russia’s role in fueling these (ultimately damaging) views in the United States, and the unusually high media profile of former IC leaders during these turbulent times.

Data, AI, and Ethics | Episode 73

Entrepreneur Evanna Hu joins me to discuss our rapidly evolving relationship with data. The explosion of data streams and technologies that offload challenging analysis to machines are creating interesting national security challenges and opportunities at lightening speed. Evanna, and her company Omelas, seek to leverage these technologies to address hard national security problems (such as countering violent extremism) where metrics have been difficult to acquire or generate.

While opportunity abounds, so do potential ethical dilemmas. It’s impossible to discuss the potential of these technologies without considering the countless ways that they could be abused. Many people still fail to appreciate the amount of data they generate and how it can be used by actors both good and bad.